Help Centre

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  1. Why is our water heating pulsating and noisy? 27/05/2019

    This is most likely an improperly constructed water-heating circuit. Make sure you re-check the layout.

    Please re-read your copy of the wetback instructions, available in our Downloads tab.

     

     

  2. What can I do if my wetback develops a thick coating on it? 27/05/2019

    The wetback can develop a coating of crusty creosote when the wood fuel is not being burnt in the most efficient way. Firewood can play a major role in the performance of a wood fire. The species is part of the picture but the most significant thing is that whatever the type of wood it must be well seasoned and dry. Best performance cannot be achieved without the best fuel.

    So back to the question...

    Burning wood at low temperature causes incomplete combustion of the oils in the wood, which are off-gassed as volatiles in the smoke. As the smoke rises through the chimney it cools, causing water, carbon, and volatiles to condense on the interior surfaces of the chimney flue. The black oily residue that builds up is referred to as creosote, which is similar in composition to the commercial products by the same name, but with a higher content of carbon black. Over the course of a season, creosote deposits can become several inches thick. This creates a compounding problem, because the creosote deposits reduce the draft (airflow through the flue) which increases the probability the wood fire is not getting enough air to burn at high temperature. Since creosote is highly combustible, a thick accumulation creates a fire hazard. If a hot fire is built in the stove or fireplace and the air control left wide open, this may allow hot oxygen into the chimney where it comes in contact with the creosote which then ignites—causing a flue fire.

    The easiest way to clean the flue is by placing a deep baking tray or similar under the base of the flue and sweep the flue down into this. This stops all the debris from falling into the top chamber and requiring vacuuming out. The build-up around the wetback is best removed by hand and the rest can be carefully removed by a vacuum cleaner.

    The wetback can be knocked out of alignment if it is moved when the creosote is being cleaned off. This can cause the constant rise to be knocked out of alignment and can result in water hammer developing in the system so be careful. The wetback can develop a coating of crusty creosote when the wood fuel is not being burnt in the most efficient way. Firewood can play a major role in the performance of a wood fire. The species is part of the picture but the most significant thing is that whatever the type of wood it must be well seasoned and dry. Best performance cannot be achieved without the best fuel.

  3. What are the technical specifications of the Pyroclassic IV? 27/05/2019

    Please see the last page of the Pyroclassic IV brochure, which can be downloaded HERE.

  4. Door knob troubleshooting 27/05/2019

    The expected lifespan of a door knob is somewhere between 4 - 10 years depending on how the fire is being operated.

    The door handle will get hot during operation and this is completely normal.

    There are two typical known causes of premature failure of the door knob. The first is excessive charring on the back of the knob due to high levels of concentrated heat from burning close behind the door area. The second cause can be due to the door being over-tightened when it is closed which in turn leads to it being very tight to open once the fire has heated up. The continued cycle of this over-tightening causes the screws to become weakened from the higher levels of load put on them in each direction each time, which eventually results in it coming loose and breaking away from their fixings.

     

    A combination of these two is actually the most common cause of door knob failure. To avoid these issues and extend the lifespan of the door knob, keep a clear area of approximately 10cm in the front of the firebox and maintain your fire underneath the air tubes in the top of the cylinder, this will give the additional benefit of letting the cylinder absorb the maximum amount of heat from your fuel load before it leaves the fire chamber.

    If you are finding the door knob too hot when trying to refuel your fire then you are probably trying to refuel too soon, the door knob is a great indicator of what’s happening within your fire so if you can’t reload then you don’t need to yet. If your door knob is starting to show signs of charring then you are probably burning your fire too close to the door. 

    Do not lean on the door or use it to help you stand up when it is open as this can cause the door to move. If your door does become misaligned then you will need to loosen the top bolt going horizontally through the hinge bar and lift the door back into the correct position for the spindle to line up and then re-tighten the bolt.

  5. What is a load limiter? 27/05/2019

    Along the top of the fire chamber is a load limiter, which is designed to restrict the operator from overloading it. This will burn off in approximately 3-7 years depending on frequency of use. The load limiter does not need replacing but the airtubes will. 

     

    Load Limiter airtubes

  6. How does burning work with the Pyroclassic IV? 27/05/2019

    Solid wood must change to gas and vapour before any burning can take place. This change occurs by heating wood to high temperatures to make the best gas fuel, low temperatures will make smoke and tars that are simply unburnt fuel. The Pyroclassic® IV is a North/South burning fire so the fire is started in the front of the fire chamber and continues along the length of the wood to the rear. To make the best use of your firewood please ensure logs are placed lengthways into the fire chamber – NOT sideways. Your objective is to achieve a high temperature in the fire chamber quickly, which is easy using the Turboslide and dry wood. You will never get the fire to burn correctly if you try starting fires with green or wet wood. The only fuel authorised for use with this appliance within Urban Clean Air Sheds and Smoke Control Zones is well seasoned wood with a moisture content of 25% or less on wet weight basis, 12-18% is ideal.

     

    How a Pyroclassic works diagram

  7. Why do I need a Wall Screen or a Flue Shield? 27/05/2019

    Pyroclassic Fires can be installed with a double skin half round flue shield or for minimum clearances from combustible walls a correctly sized wall screen must be installed, the clearances for these are shown in the relevant Tech Spec sheet for each fire. 

    Alternatively you can install a Pyroclassic Fire without wall screens if you chose to use a non-combustible wall board product such as Eterpan, Supalux or Promina board and install it as per the manufacture specifications. Usually this involves ensuring a 25mm air gap is maintained between the wall board and any timber framing, through the bottom, up between the combustible surface and the screening material and out of the top.

    In some instances the wall may not contain any combustible material and therefore will not require any screening.

    Pyroclassic Wall Screens now have a simple keyhole hanging system to make installation very easy.

  8. Why did I have a Flue Fire? 27/05/2019

    Your flue fire has been caused by a build-up of unburnt gases that have cooled and solidified in your flue pipes that have then collected more unburnt solids slowly building up until you have then had a high fire situation that has ignited this very combustible fuel deposits which can then burn at temps up to 2000 degrees potentially causing structural damage to the flue pipes themselves. This build up has most likely occurred due to either poor fuel quality resulting in poor combustion and/or due to continuous low heat fires which don’t allow complete secondary combustion thus allowing these particles to exit the fire without being converted to heat.

     

     

  9. What proportion of heat comes from the back of the fire and the flue in comparison to the front and sides? 27/05/2019

    This is a difficult question to answer. Most of the radiant heat from the fire comes from the top plate (more front than back) and the door area. The cooler convection heat comes off the extruded coloured panels around the sides and the front of the fire.

    By comparison, the heat from the rear of the unit is much less than that from the other sides but it can still get to quite a temperature around that area. What that temperature is can vary depending on what the fire is doing, it is almost never a static output.

     

     

  10. Air Supply 27/05/2019

    The room or space containing the Pyroclassic needs no additional ventilation unless a draught stabilizer is fitted, in which case a permanent opening of at least 1500mm2 should be provided. Any air opening must be kept clear from blockage and obstruction. Due consideration should be given to air requirements for any other appliances in the same room or home, such as heat transfer kits, kitchen range hoods, laundry dryers, bathroom vents etc.

    If your fire has been installed into a new build home, these are constructed to be far more air tight than older housing can have an significant impact on the free air available over time to the fire, especially when other forms of mechanical extraction from within the home are used such as range hoods, dryers, wet room extraction etc.  In severe cases the flue pipe can actually end up being used as the means of ventilation causing the flue gases to then be drawn into the house.  This is not a fault of the fire but a flaw in the inadequate ventilation planning of the house construction and NZ building code.

    A further point of note on the house topic is the location of the house in relation to its surroundings and the termination of the flue system, this is often referred to as downdraft.