Help Centre

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  1. How do I fix down draft? 04/07/2020

    Download our down draft troubleshooting tips HERE.

  2. How do I light my first fire? 04/07/2020

    1. Soak the reusable fire starters in methylated spirits. Tip: It is also handy to store the fire-lighters in a glass jar filled with methylated spirit.

    2. Slide the Turboslide to the far right or far left position. This opens the air hole inside the door and allows air to flow through acting like an old fashioned pair of bellows.

    3. Place DRY kindling and a few small logs lengthways in the front of the fire chamber leaving a clear space in front of the air inlet hole.

    4. Place a soaked fire starter just under the kindling at the front of the fire chamber and light it. Try to avoid dripping methylated spirit on to any surface when doing this as it can discolour some hearth materials.

    5. Close the door.

    6. Once the fire is burning really well and you have a nice bed of hot embers, move the Turboslide to the central position (to cover the air inlet hole), this can be done slowly in several stages if preferred.

    7. When opening the door to load more wood, slide the Turboslide to the far left or right open position, and continue as in number 6.

  3. When and how should I clean the flue? 04/07/2020

    Pyroclassic Fires are renowned for burning very cleanly when dry fuel is used but you should still always clean your flue once a year. This is often a requirement for many insurance companies.

    Keeping your flue pipes clean will help eliminate the risk of a flue fire. Your flue is also a great indication of how your wood fuel is performing. If the pipes are clean then the wood is good, if the pipes are filling up with carbon, creosote and tar deposits then you may need to revisit the operating instructions and refresh yourself with how to create a cleaner burning fire.

    The easiest way to clean the flue is by placing a deep baking tray or similar under the base of the flue and sweep the flue down into this, this stops all the debris from falling into the top chamber and requiring vacuuming out. Sweeping the flue into the top chamber is never a good idea as it can restrict the flow of gasses from the primary fire chamber and cause your fire to perform poorly.

    To clean the top chamber and wetback, you will need to remove the top plate (it just lifts off) and clean out the top chamber of soot and creosote. Take care not to remove any of the Kaowool lining during cleaning and ensure that the gasket is all intact before replacing the top plate. Support the flue with a frame made of wood so you can easily remove the top plate.

    The build-up around the wetback is best removed by hand. The wetback can be knocked out of alignment if it is moved when the creosote is being cleaned off so be careful as this can cause the constant rise to be knocked out of alignment and can result in water hammer developing in the system.

  4. Can I use a heat transfer kit? 04/07/2020

    The simple answer is yes.

    The thing with heat transfer kits is they work well with excess heat. The Pyroclassic IV produces a different kind of heat than your traditional 'black box' style wood fire. The black box fires spit out heat almost instantly as long as you keep refueling it regularly so will therefore provide you with excess heat which is why heat transfer kits are useful for these kind of fires. The Pyro on the other hand takes longer to heat up but once up to temperature retains this heat like a kiln and gives off a lovely, warm more consistent heat with less fuel needed once the cylindrical ceramic fire chamber is hot.

    Many Pyro customers find this as the biggest advantage of a Pyro and have it going for 2-3 months solid during winter. However, it won't necessarily provide lots of excess heat for use in a transfer system. Our recommendation is to install the Pyro first before the transfer system as you may likely find you don't require one.

    It is worth noting that in newer homes which have much better seals around doors and windows these kits can cause a negative pressure to build up in the room the fire is in as all the air is being sucked out. This results in the fire being starved of air and in some cases has even caused smoke from the starving fire being drawn back into the room. This same effect can also be caused by powerful range hoods and other fan forced systems in newer, more airtight housing.

    If you are building a very airtight home, we recommend you put in an air vent, approximately the size of a fire brick. The Pyroclassic IV needs 3.6 cubic metres of air per kilogram of wood to operate effectively.

  5. Why did I have a Flue Fire? 04/07/2020

    Your flue fire has been caused by a build-up of unburnt gases that have cooled and solidified in your flue pipes that have then collected more unburnt solids slowly building up until you have then had a high fire situation that has ignited this very combustible fuel deposits which can then burn at temps up to 2000 degrees potentially causing structural damage to the flue pipes themselves. This build up has most likely occurred due to either poor fuel quality resulting in poor combustion and/or due to continuous low heat fires which don’t allow complete secondary combustion thus allowing these particles to exit the fire without being converted to heat.

     

     

  6. Why are there cracks and deterioration in my Pyroclassic cylinder? 04/07/2020

    This is a natural way to relieve built-up stress in refractories. It has no effect on operation, performance or useful life of the unit. The firebox is an arch structure, the most stable and permanent construction known. These cracks will develop over time and is nothing to worry about. 

    Due to it being cast as a one piece cylinder it goes through some expansion and contraction every time it is heat cycled. This is just the cylinder relieving its inert tension and results in a variety of different levels of cracking. 

    These cracks and blisters can slowly grow over time due to erosion through use. If you do not like the appearance of the cylinder when cracks appear, you can purchase veneering cement which can be mixed to a toothpaste like consistency and inserted into the cracked areas.

    The story goes that the two original designers each had a Pyro and one touched up his cylinder every year and the other never touched his...25 years later both fires were still working albeit one was looked in better looking condition internally than the other!

     25 year-old Pyroclassic II Cylinder 

    IMG 0241

     

  7. How do I use my moisture meter? 04/07/2020

    The moisture meter is intended to be used regularly throughout the drying process, from when you first get your wood fuel delivered right through to just before burning it. It will allow you to know exactly what the moisture content of the wood fuel you are using is and it will ensure that if used correctly your new fire will be able to perform well. Poor quality wood fuel is the number one cause of issues with all wood fires and flue systems.

  8. What dimension is the cylinder? 04/07/2020

    The cylinder of the Pyroclassic IV is 555 mm long, 367 mm outside diameter and 307 mm inside diameter

    The cylinder of the Pyroclassic Mini is 368 mm long, 367 mm outside diameter and 307 mm inside diameter

    The cylinder is 30 mm thick

     

     

  9. What proportion of heat comes from the back of the fire and the flue in comparison to the front and sides? 04/07/2020

    This is a difficult question to answer. Most of the radiant heat from the fire comes from the top plate (more front than back) and the door area. The cooler convection heat comes off the extruded coloured panels around the sides and the front of the fire.

    By comparison, the heat from the rear of the unit is much less than that from the other sides but it can still get to quite a temperature around that area. What that temperature is can vary depending on what the fire is doing, it is almost never a static output.

     

     

  10. I would like to move my existing wood fire to another location within the same house? 04/07/2020

    An existing burner that is moved within a house is considered to be a newly installed burner, so it must meet the woodburner standards in the National Environmental Standards for Air Quality. You may also need a building consent.

     

    See more information at http://www.mfe.govt.nz/air/national-environmental-standards-air-quality