Help Centre

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  1. How do I clean the outside of the Pyroclassic and the flue pipes? 25/09/2018

    The powder coated panels on the Pyroclassic IV can be wiped clean with some light detergent and warm water.  You can choose to do this with the panels on the fire or remove them for a more thorough cleaning. Be careful when you remove the front panel to not tear the insulating gasket which is on the inside of the panel: you will need to pull the centre of the panel forward slightly to allow it to clear the space behind it when you slide it up.

    The stainless steel flue pipe can be cleaned using a soft cloth with a small amount of methylated spirits soaked into it. Try to avoid touching the flue pipe with your bare hands as this leaves oils from the skin on the pipe and becomes very hard to remove once the pipes have been heat cycled.

     

     

  2. What size firewood should I be using in my Pyroclassic Fire? 25/09/2018

    Logs should be approximately 100- 120 mm in diameter by around 300mm - 400mm long for your Pyroclassic IV Fire.   

    Logs should be approximately 100-120 mm in diameter by around 200-250mm long for your Pyroclassic Mini Fire. 

     

     

  3. Why do I need a Wall Screen or a Flue Shield? 25/09/2018

    Pyroclassic Fires can be installed with a double skin half round flue shield or for minimum clearances from combustible walls a correctly sized wall screen must be installed, the clearances for these are shown in the relevant Tech Spec sheet for each fire. 

    Alternatively you can install a Pyroclassic Fire without wall screens if you chose to use a non-combustible wall board product such as Eterpan, Supalux or Promina board and install it as per the manufacture specifications. Usually this involves ensuring a 25mm air gap is maintained between the wall board and any timber framing, through the bottom, up between the combustible surface and the screening material and out of the top.

    In some instances the wall may not contain any combustible material and therefore will not require any screening.

    Pyroclassic Wall Screens now have a simple keyhole hanging system to make installation very easy.

  4. How do I light my first fire? 25/09/2018

    1. Soak the reusable fire starters in methylated spirits. Tip: It is also handy to store the fire-lighters in a glass jar filled with methylated spirit.

    2. Slide the Turboslide to the far right or far left position. This opens the air hole inside the door and allows air to flow through acting like an old fashioned pair of bellows.

    3. Place DRY kindling and a few small logs lengthways in the front of the fire chamber leaving a clear space in front of the air inlet hole.

    4. Place a soaked fire starter just under the kindling at the front of the fire chamber and light it. Try to avoid dripping methylated spirit on to any surface when doing this as it can discolour some hearth materials.

    5. Close the door.

    6. Once the fire is burning really well and you have a nice bed of hot embers, move the Turboslide to the central position (to cover the air inlet hole), this can be done slowly in several stages if preferred.

    7. When opening the door to load more wood, slide the Turboslide to the far left or right open position, and continue as in number 6.

  5. More information about the 2 hectare rule under the NES 25/09/2018

    Most urban areas in New Zealand experience air pollution during winter. Our focus is on improving air quality in those areas. Urban areas typically have smaller property sizes and as there is no nationally consistent definition for an urban environment, a property size of less than 2 hectares was used. The standard two hectare rule applies throughout New Zealand including rural areas.

     

    See more information at http://www.mfe.govt.nz/air/national-environmental-standards-air-quality

     

  6. Door knob troubleshooting 25/09/2018

    The expected lifespan of a door knob is somewhere between 4 - 10 years depending on how the fire is being operated.

    The door handle will get hot during operation and this is completely normal.

    There are two typical known causes of premature failure of the door knob. The first is excessive charring on the back of the knob due to high levels of concentrated heat from burning close behind the door area. The second cause can be due to the door being over-tightened when it is closed which in turn leads to it being very tight to open once the fire has heated up. The continued cycle of this over-tightening causes the screws to become weakened from the higher levels of load put on them in each direction each time, which eventually results in it coming loose and breaking away from their fixings.

     

    A combination of these two is actually the most common cause of door knob failure. To avoid these issues and extend the lifespan of the door knob, keep a clear area of approximately 10cm in the front of the firebox and maintain your fire underneath the air tubes in the top of the cylinder, this will give the additional benefit of letting the cylinder absorb the maximum amount of heat from your fuel load before it leaves the fire chamber.

    If you are finding the door knob too hot when trying to refuel your fire then you are probably trying to refuel too soon, the door knob is a great indicator of what’s happening within your fire so if you can’t reload then you don’t need to yet. If your door knob is starting to show signs of charring then you are probably burning your fire too close to the door. 

    Do not lean on the door or use it to help you stand up when it is open as this can cause the door to move. If your door does become misaligned then you will need to loosen the top bolt going horizontally through the hinge bar and lift the door back into the correct position for the spindle to line up and then re-tighten the bolt.

  7. Our Pyroclassic fire appears to have 'rust-like' dust coming out at the bottom. What is this? 25/09/2018

    The rust dust is probably just the exposed bottom edges of the top valley walls where they meet the cylinder rap rusting a little bit due to moisture passing through the fire from the wood fuel. This is where it tends to collect and is quite normal to see and is nothing to be concerned about.

     

  8. How to replace the door to glass sealing gasket 25/09/2018

    Download the instructions here -  Replacing-Door-to-Glass-Sealing-Gasket.pdf

  9. Why are there cracks and deterioration in my Pyroclassic cylinder? 25/09/2018

    This is a natural way to relieve built-up stress in refractories. It has no effect on operation, performance or useful life of the unit. The firebox is an arch structure, the most stable and permanent construction known. These cracks will develop over time and is nothing to worry about. 

    Due to it being cast as a one piece cylinder it goes through some expansion and contraction every time it is heat cycled. This is just the cylinder relieving its inert tension and results in a variety of different levels of cracking. 

    These cracks and blisters can slowly grow over time due to erosion through use. If you do not like the appearance of the cylinder when cracks appear, you can purchase veneering cement which can be mixed to a toothpaste like consistency and inserted into the cracked areas.

    The story goes that the two original designers each had a Pyro and one touched up his cylinder every year and the other never touched his...25 years later both fires were still working albeit one was looked in better looking condition internally than the other!

     25 year-old Pyroclassic II Cylinder 

    IMG 0241

     

  10. How does the Pyroclassic IV burn overnight? 25/09/2018

    The overnight burn ability of the Pyroclassic IV is 100% dependent on the quality and size of fuel you put in it.

    You will need to have a good ember bed established, then add 2 or 3 dry hardwood logs (preferably Kanuka) measuring approximately 400mm long by 120mm thick into the fire box. Allow the flames to establish on the front ends of the logs and then ensure the turboslide is fully closed meaning the air flow into the fire is controlled by the fire itself. The further back in the fire chamber you have the fire the longer it will burn for.

    Remember, you need to add a kilo of fuel for every hour burn time required. If you follow these instructions you should have some hot embers left in the back of the fire chamber in the morning ready to be brought forward to establish another fire.

    As a point of caution you should never insert a fresh log which is too large or placed in the fire too late to ensure a flaming combustion, doing this will cook the wood fuel on the remaining embers releasing unburnt volatile gases into the combustion chamber which will eventually reach a point of ignition, this can result in a sizable explosion inside the fire chamber and may cause damage to the unit.