Help Centre

Click on the heading of the article in red to open the full article. 

  1. Our flue pipe is showing signs of going brown, is this normal? 19/01/2018

    The flue pipes will change colour depending on how hot they have been. Like all metals, when exposed to the heat they go through a process called tempering or metallurgy which is explained in more detail here.

    If there are any oil deposits like fingerprints etc. on the pipes then these can show up once they have been heat cycled and are much harder to remove. Any time the flue is touched it is worth following our instructions and have them wiped down with some methylated spirits.

    If there is a concentrated spot of heat like a ring around the pipe then this is an indication of a possible internal flue fire. If this is the case then a sweep would be recommended.

     

  2. What are the technical specifications of the Pyroclassic IV? 19/01/2018

    Please see the last page of the Pyroclassic IV brochure, which can be downloaded HERE.

  3. How much does it cost? 19/01/2018

    To download the RRP price list of our Pyroclassic wood fire and accessories, click HERE. 

  4. How does burning work with the Pyroclassic IV? 19/01/2018

    Solid wood must change to gas and vapour before any burning can take place. This change occurs by heating wood to high temperatures to make the best gas fuel, low temperatures will make smoke and tars that are simply unburnt fuel. The Pyroclassic® IV is a North/South burning fire so the fire is started in the front of the fire chamber and continues along the length of the wood to the rear. To make the best use of your firewood please ensure logs are placed lengthways into the fire chamber – NOT sideways. Your objective is to achieve a high temperature in the fire chamber quickly, which is easy using the Turboslide and dry wood. You will never get the fire to burn correctly if you try starting fires with green or wet wood. The only fuel authorised for use with this appliance within Urban Clean Air Sheds and Smoke Control Zones is well seasoned wood with a moisture content of 25% or less on wet weight basis, 12-18% is ideal.

     

    How a Pyroclassic works diagram

  5. Do I need to grease the doorknob spindle? 19/01/2018

    A small amount of graphite grease should be applied sparingly and only occasionally to the spindle of the doorknob, twice a year is usually sufficient.

    Ashes from the fire have a gritty texture and over time this can cause wear on the doorknob spindle. Use a tiny amount of grease to lubricate the groove in the first thread of the spindle which can be applied with a matchstick or cocktail stick.

    Please note: only a small amount is needed, if too much is used it will melt and dribble down causing an unsightly stain, be sure to remove any excess before relighting the unit.

  6. Why do I need a Wall Screen or a Flue Shield? 19/01/2018

    Pyroclassic Fires can be installed with a double skin half round flue shield or for minimum clearances from combustible walls a correctly sized wall screen must be installed, the clearances for these are shown in the relevant Tech Spec sheet for each fire.  

    Alternatively you can install a Pyroclassic Fire without wall screens if you chose to use a non-combustible wall board product such as Eterpan, Supalux or Promina board and install it as per the manufacture specifications. Usually this involves ensuring a 25mm air gap is maintained between the wall board and any timber framing, through the bottom, up between the combustible surface and the screening material and out of the top.

    In some instances the wall may not contain any combustible material and therefore will not require any screening. 

    Pyroclassic Wall Screens now have a simple keyhole hanging system to make installation very easy.

  7. What are the ceramic chips/divots in my cylinder? Is it normal? 19/01/2018

    These are exposed air blisters and are completely normal. The blisters are a result of small air pockets getting trapped just at the edge of the surface in our castings. Depending on how much air is trapped inside these, they sometimes erupt and take a piece of the ceramic off. These will not affect the performance of the fire at all.

    There is over 35mm of thickness to the cylinder, and this is then wrapped in a thick insulating blanket and a complete steel band to ensure that nothing can escape from the cylinder walls. 

     

    Example:

    Pyroclassic divots

     

     

  8. Where does the wood burner standard apply? 19/01/2018

    Everywhere in New Zealand on properties of less than two hectares.

  9. What are the National Environmental Standards for Air Quality? 19/01/2018

    The National Environmental Standards for Air Quality (NES) are regulations made under the Resource Management Act 1991 which aim to set a guaranteed minimum level of health protection for all New Zealanders.

    The NES came into effect on 8 October 2004. They are made up of 14 separate but interlinked standards.

    These include:

    • seven standards banning activities that discharge significant quantities of dioxins and other toxics into the air
    • five standards for ambient (outdoor) air quality
    • a design standard for new wood burners installed in urban areas
    • a requirement for landfills over 1 million tonnes of refuse to collect greenhouse gas emissions

  10. What can I do if my wetback develops a thick coating on it? 19/01/2018

    The wetback can develop a coating of crusty creosote when the wood fuel is not being burnt in the most efficient way. Firewood can play a major role in the performance of a wood fire. The species is part of the picture but the most significant thing is that whatever the type of wood it must be well seasoned and dry. Best performance cannot be achieved without the best fuel.

    So back to the question...

    Burning wood at low temperature causes incomplete combustion of the oils in the wood, which are off-gassed as volatiles in the smoke. As the smoke rises through the chimney it cools, causing water, carbon, and volatiles to condense on the interior surfaces of the chimney flue. The black oily residue that builds up is referred to as creosote, which is similar in composition to the commercial products by the same name, but with a higher content of carbon black. Over the course of a season, creosote deposits can become several inches thick. This creates a compounding problem, because the creosote deposits reduce the draft (airflow through the flue) which increases the probability the wood fire is not getting enough air to burn at high temperature. Since creosote is highly combustible, a thick accumulation creates a fire hazard. If a hot fire is built in the stove or fireplace and the air control left wide open, this may allow hot oxygen into the chimney where it comes in contact with the creosote which then ignites—causing a flue fire. 

    The easiest way to clean the flue is by placing a deep baking tray or similar under the base of the flue and sweep the flue down into this. This stops all the debris from falling into the top chamber and requiring vacuuming out. The build-up around the wetback is best removed by hand and the rest can be carefully removed by a vacuum cleaner.

    The wetback can be knocked out of alignment if it is moved when the creosote is being cleaned off. This can cause the constant rise to be knocked out of alignment and can result in water hammer developing in the system so be careful.